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Why do I need Mr Tickle Arms to Read my Paper?

As we get older the flexibility of the lens inside your eye reduces. This is called Presbyopia. This means that you are less able to focus on things that are close to you, so you may need reading glasses. When you look at something close up, for example a book, the muscles inside your eye surrounding the lens contract to make the lens change shape. This focuses the light from the book onto the retina. The lens inside a child's eye is elastic so can change shape easily. As we get older the lens naturally stiffens and so it changes shape less easily. This means we are no longer able to focus on things close to us, having to hold things further away to see things clearly. This change tends to

Will my Lenses fit any Frame?

Generally any lens can fit into any frame. However, we must take into consideration the prescription we are working with as this will help us to determine how thick or thin the lenses can be. It will also help us to determine the design of the lens we will need to use. We then have to consider the design of the frame, is it rimless? Semi-rimless? Full rim or in line glazed frames? All of this will help us to advise what material of lens we need to use as some lenses have elastic properties hence will be better suited to rimless glasses for example. Some stronger prescriptions may need high index thin lenses to achieve the best results. We would also need to consider how the wearer will be us

Can we tell if you have Diabetes by looking into your Eyes?

When attending for a sight test the optometrist will not only advise you on whether you need glasses but will also do a health check. Many systemic conditions like diabetes can be seen to affect the eyes. However, it is very important to remember secondary changes in the eye usually occur when the underlying condition is more established rather than in the early stages. A healthy eye does not mean you do not suffer with an underlying systemic condition but the best guarantee is to see your GP for the necessary health tests. Diabetes is one of the most common systemic conditions that can affect the eyes and can be observed when checking the health of eyes in a number of ways. Diabetic Retinop

What is Keratoconus?

Keratoconus (also known as Pellucid) is a progressive non-inflammatory disorder that causes a characteristic thinning and cone-like steepening of the cornea. This steepening results in distortion of vision, increased sensitivity to glare and light and an associated reduction in visual acuity. These symptoms usually appear in the late teens and early twenties. Keratoconus may progress for 10-20 years and then can slow or even stabilize. Each eye can be affected differently. This can result in a dramatic decrease in the ability to see clearly even with corrective lenses. New research shows that Keratoconus is much more common today than it was in past. Years ago, Keratoconus occurred in 1 in 2

What's the Difference Between a Sight Test and an Eye Examination?

A sight test is really just what it says... it is a test of how well, or not, a person can see, and a measurement of any corrective prescription that could be used to give someone the best vision possible. A sight test could involve additional tests such as visual fields and eye pressures but may not always detect underlying conditions requiring deeper investigation. A ‘sight test’ is just one part of a more comprehensive ‘eye examination’. An eye examination is a series of tests performed by an ophthalmologist (medical doctor), or an optometrist, assessing vision and ability to focus on and discern objects, as well as other tests and examinations pertaining to the eyes. Health care profes

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